SNCC 60TH ANNIVERSARY (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) October 14-16, 2021 CONFERENCE Register Now SNCC 60TH ANNIVERSARY (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) October 14-16, 2021 CONFERENCE Register Now SNCC 60TH ANNIVERSARY (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) October 14-16, 2021 CONFERENCE Register Now SNCC 60TH ANNIVERSARY (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) October 14-16, 2021 CONFERENCE Register Now
2021/10/14 12:00:00

ORGANIZING OUR STRENGTH FOR TOMORROW

SNCC 60TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION: A MULTI-GENERATIONAL CONFERENCE

Sixty years ago, young activists gathered at Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina, on April 15, 1960, to begin planning their generation’s obligation to continue a struggle that began long before they were born: the freedom and empowerment of Black people. Following this initial gathering, students met again in October in Atlanta, Georgia, and formally named their new organization the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). SNCC was then the only youth-led national civil rights organization. Now, at this important time in our history, we invite you to join us, virtually, on October 14-16, 2021 to honor and carry this struggle forward. We plan to bring together not just SNCC veterans, but also a wide array of today’s young on-the-ground activists and organizers. It is not a gathering of reminiscence. It is a gathering of strength and will to face the future with determination, optimism… and continued organizing.

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I wonder is white power dying?

Fannie Lou Hamer Fannie Lou Hamer © George Ballis/Take Stock
Victoria Gray Holding Sign Victoria Gray © George Ballis/Take Stock
Gloria Richardson Gloria Richardson © Danny Lyon
Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom Now Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom
Now
© Matt Herron/ Take Stock
Lowndes County, AL Voting Line Lowndes County, AL Voting Line © Maria Varela Photography

Agenda

Agenda Subject To Change

ORGANIZING FOR THE VOTE: POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC POWER

1:00pm – 2:15pm

> Plenary Session – The Power of the Past

Hard-won and hard-fought for gains in education and in political arenas are under assault as we view today’s voter suppression and voter nullification in a larger context. This has happened before and it informs our analysis as we pivot from the historical to an analysis of what is happening now.

2:25pm – 3:35pm : Concurrent Sessions

> The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP)

1961-1964 — Asserting our political place and power in Mississippi

> Lowndes County Alabama

1965-1969 — Putting Black Power into Practice

> Making Our Way Into Political Office to Make Change

1968 – Present

3:50pm – 5:00pm : Concurrent Sessions

> Organizing the Black Community to Get Out and Vote in 2022 and 2024: A Heavy Lift

> A Case Study: The Fight for the Educational Ballot Initiative in Mississippi

> Attorneys General and District Attorneys and Struggle to Make the Justice System Work

5:00pm – 6:00pm

> 60 Years Strong! A celebration honoring SNCC and its veterans

SEIZE THE MOMENT: MAKING CHANGE AT ALL LEVELS

1:00pm – 2:05pm

> SEIZE THE MOMENT – Effecting Change at City, County, State and Federal Levels

The Black community encounters policies and actions of government at the municipal, county and state levels daily. Change at these levels can immediately relieve some of the most fundamental problems faced by many, such as disparities related to food, water, land, shelter, education and security.

2:25pm – 3:35pm : Concurrent Sessions

> Policing and Changing the Mission of the Criminal Justice System

> Economic Power and Economic Security

A political presence alone does not guarantee the wellbeing of the Black community. How do we insure that we are politically and economically poised for dramatic improvements at all levels.

> Education for Self Determination and the Future Economy

What form of education is necessary to actually educate and insure a strong economic presence for the Black Community in the 21st Century?

3:50pm – 5:00pm : Concurrent Sessions

> Environmental Injustice, Health and Related Disparities

Across the country there are major problems with polluted water, outdated infrastructure and dangerous environmental hazards. Inadequate medical and health care resources exacerbate the problems.

> Affordable Housing

The issue of affordable housing and the creation of safe, stable neighborhoods needs to be addressed. Are there models that point towards a promising future?

> The Importance of Land and the Fight Against Food Insecurity

Thousands of people live in food deserts, are dependent on food handouts and spend their days without enough food to meet their basic nutritional needs, especially those of children. Innovative solutions and proposals for lasting change are coming from urban centers and rural areas fighting Black land loss.

5:00pm – 6:00pm

> A Cultural Celebration “SNCC and Black Culture – 60 Years of Change”

Join us for a joyful hour bearing witness to the powerful ways in which our lives have been transformed through the music and words of the Movement

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

1:00pm – 2:15pm : Plenary Session

> The Path Forward: A Look at the 21st Century Racial Environment

2:25pm – 3:35pm : Concurrent Sessions

> The Importance of the Narrative: HBCUs and Africana Studies Programs

Preserving our culture and passing the wealth of knowledge from generation to generation is essential. Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), Black Studies and Africana programs play an important role.

> Telling and Teaching the SNCC Story from the Inside Out and the Bottom Up

The SNCC Digital Gateway (SDG), the Civil Rights Movement Archive (CRMA) and Zinn Education Project offer three useful examples of framing the story from the inside out and the bottom up. However, these important resources will mean nothing if teachers are prevented from using them. Fortunately, educators continue to teach “hard history” and highlight the “ordinary” people — like those in their students’ own communities and the students themselves — who were/are activists in civil rights and human rights movements. Knowing this history helps students better understand the present… and their role in shaping the future.

> Building Institutional Memory

To preserve and share the narrative of our history and our present realities, we must go beyond the printed word and screens to places where our history is on display. We must preserve the objects and artifacts that speak volumes and help future generations understand the remarkable strength and endurance of those who came before us.

3:50pm – 5:00pm : Concurrent Sessions

> The Power to Decide: The Importance of Building Political Alliances and Strategic Coalitions

The assault on democracy affects us all. Coalescing around common issues is a source of strength.

> The Importance of Controlling Local, State and Federal Budgets

It’s in the budget! Politicians can say anything, but their actions are shown in budgets. Whether it’s policing, schools, or clean water, there are surprising answers to be found by looking in budgets that determine so much.

> Where Do We Go From Here?

As we look towards the future, what must we do to strengthen and protect the Black community? How will technological and demographic change affect Black struggle?

3:50pm – 5:00pm

> Book Event – “Hands on the Freedom Plow” features some of the women of SNCC in their own words

Meet the Authors – SNCC veterans talk about their writing, the story of SNCC it tells and they meet with participants

5:00pm – 6:00pm

> Closing – A Salute and Encouragement to the Upcoming Generations

Young organizers and activists of today join SNCC in looking at the years ahead with an eye on both the immediate challenges and those in the distant future.

Thursday, October 14, 2021

ORGANIZING FOR THE VOTE: POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC POWER

1:00pm – 2:15pm

> Plenary Session – The Power of the Past

Hard-won and hard-fought for gains in education and in political arenas are under assault as we view today’s voter suppression and voter nullification in a larger context. This has happened before and it informs our analysis as we pivot from the historical to an analysis of what is happening now.

2:25pm – 3:35pm : Concurrent Sessions

> The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP)

1961-1964 — Asserting our political place and power in Mississippi

> Lowndes County Alabama

1965-1969 — Putting Black Power into Practice

> Making Our Way Into Political Office to Make Change

1968 – Present

3:50pm – 5:00pm : Concurrent Sessions

> Organizing the Black Community to Get Out and Vote in 2022 and 2024: A Heavy Lift

> A Case Study: The Fight for the Educational Ballot Initiative in Mississippi

> Attorneys General and District Attorneys and Struggle to Make the Justice System Work

5:00pm – 6:00pm

> 60 Years Strong! A celebration honoring SNCC and its veterans

Friday, October 15, 2021

SEIZE THE MOMENT: MAKING CHANGE AT ALL LEVELS

1:00pm – 2:05pm

> SEIZE THE MOMENT – Effecting Change at City, County, State and Federal Levels

The Black community encounters policies and actions of government at the municipal, county and state levels daily. Change at these levels can immediately relieve some of the most fundamental problems faced by many, such as disparities related to food, water, land, shelter, education and security.

2:25pm – 3:35pm : Concurrent Sessions

> Policing and Changing the Mission of the Criminal Justice System

> Economic Power and Economic Security

A political presence alone does not guarantee the wellbeing of the Black community. How do we insure that we are politically and economically poised for dramatic improvements at all levels.

> Education for Self Determination and the Future Economy

What form of education is necessary to actually educate and insure a strong economic presence for the Black Community in the 21st Century?

3:50pm – 5:00pm : Concurrent Sessions

> Environmental Injustice, Health and Related Disparities

Across the country there are major problems with polluted water, outdated infrastructure and dangerous environmental hazards. Inadequate medical and health care resources exacerbate the problems.

> Affordable Housing

The issue of affordable housing and the creation of safe, stable neighborhoods needs to be addressed. Are there models that point towards a promising future?

> The Importance of Land and the Fight Against Food Insecurity

Thousands of people live in food deserts, are dependent on food handouts and spend their days without enough food to meet their basic nutritional needs, especially those of children. Innovative solutions and proposals for lasting change are coming from urban centers and rural areas fighting Black land loss.

5:00pm – 6:00pm

> A Cultural Celebration “SNCC and Black Culture – 60 Years of Change”

Join us for a joyful hour bearing witness to the powerful ways in which our lives have been transformed through the music and words of the Movement

Saturday, October 16, 2021

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

1:00pm – 2:15pm : Plenary Session

> The Path Forward: A Look at the 21st Century Racial Environment

2:25pm – 3:35pm : Concurrent Sessions

> The Importance of the Narrative: HBCUs and Africana Studies Programs

Preserving our culture and passing the wealth of knowledge from generation to generation is essential. Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), Black Studies and Africana programs play an important role.

> Telling and Teaching the SNCC Story from the Inside Out and the Bottom Up

The SNCC Digital Gateway (SDG), the Civil Rights Movement Archive (CRMA) and Zinn Education Project offer three useful examples of framing the story from the inside out and the bottom up. However, these important resources will mean nothing if teachers are prevented from using them. Fortunately, educators continue to teach “hard history” and highlight the “ordinary” people — like those in their students’ own communities and the students themselves — who were/are activists in civil rights and human rights movements. Knowing this history helps students better understand the present… and their role in shaping the future.

> Building Institutional Memory

To preserve and share the narrative of our history and our present realities, we must go beyond the printed word and screens to places where our history is on display. We must preserve the objects and artifacts that speak volumes and help future generations understand the remarkable strength and endurance of those who came before us.

3:50pm – 5:00pm : Concurrent Sessions

> The Power to Decide: The Importance of Building Political Alliances and Strategic Coalitions

The assault on democracy affects us all. Coalescing around common issues is a source of strength.

> The Importance of Controlling Local, State and Federal Budgets

It’s in the budget! Politicians can say anything, but their actions are shown in budgets. Whether it’s policing, schools, or clean water, there are surprising answers to be found by looking in budgets that determine so much.

> Where Do We Go From Here?

As we look towards the future, what must we do to strengthen and protect the Black community? How will technological and demographic change affect Black struggle?

3:50pm – 5:00pm

> Book Event – “Hands on the Freedom Plow” features some of the women of SNCC in their own words

Meet the Authors – SNCC veterans talk about their writing, the story of SNCC it tells and they meet with participants

5:00pm – 6:00pm

> Closing – A Salute and Encouragement to the Upcoming Generations

Young organizers and activists of today join SNCC in looking at the years ahead with an eye on both the immediate challenges and those in the distant future.

If you are already registered and need to login click here

Leadership

HONORARY CO-CHAIRS

Dr. David Buckley

Dr. David Beckley

President Emeritus, Rust College, Holly Springs, Mississippi
Harry Belafonte

Harry Belafonte

Artist, Activist, Producer, Civil Rights Leader
Elise Bryant

Elise Bryant

President, Coalition of Labor Union Women
Colin A. ``Topper`` Carew

Colin A. ``Topper`` Carew

Film Director, Screen Writer, Producer and Architect
Dr. Greg Carr

Dr. Greg Carr

Chair, Department of Afro American Studies at Howard University
Dr. Clayborn Carson

Dr. Clayborn Carson

Professor of History at Stanford University, Director of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute
Dr. William Chafe

Dr. William Chafe

Alice Mary Baldwin Professor Emeritus of History, Duke University Center for Documentary Studies
Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr

Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr.

President and CEO, National Newspaper Publishers Association
Rev. Neal Christie

Rev. Neal Christie

Assistant General Secretary, Church and Society, United Methodist Church
Rev. Kaji Dousa

Rev. Kaji Dousa

Pastor, Park Avenue Christian Church, Co-Chair of the New Sanctuary Immigration Rights Coalition NYC
The Hon. Shirley Franklin

The Hon. Shirley Franklin

former Mayor, City of Atlanta, Georgia
Rachel Gilmer and Jonnel Edwards

Rachel Gilmer and Jonnel Edwards

Co-Directors, Dream Defenders, Advocacy, Leadership, & Research
Danny Glover

Danny Glover

Artist, Activist, Film Director
Ernie Green

Ernie Green

Little Rock Nine, first African-American to graduate Little Rock Central High School in 1958
Ash-Lee Woodard Henderson

Ash-Lee Woodard Henderson

Co-Director, The Highlander Center
The Hon. Eleanor Holmes Norton

The Hon. Eleanor Holmes Norton

Congressional Delegate, District of Columbia, 15th term
Mary Hooks

Mary Hooks

Co-Director, Southerners on New Ground (SONG) The Political Home of LGBTQ People
D’Atra Jackson and Janae Bonsu

D’Atra Jackson and Janae Bonsu

Co-Directors, Black Youth Project 100
Christina Jimenez

Christina Jimenez

Executive Director, United We Dream, Immigration Activist, 2017 MacArthur Fellow
Derrick Johnson

Derrick Johnson

President and CEO, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
Dr. Michael Lomax

Dr. Michael Lomax

President and CEO, United Negro College Fund
William Lucy

William Lucy

President Emeritus, Coalition of Black Trade Unionists
Ronald Mason, Jr., JD

Ronald Mason, Jr., JD

President of the University of the District of Columbia
Dr. Al Yates

Dr. Al Yates

President, GSSA Research, Former Colorado State University President
Sonia Sanchez

Sonia Sanchez

Poet, Activist Educator, Publisher
Gustavo Torres

Gustavo Torres

Executive Director, Casa de Maryland

SNCC LEGACY PROJECT BOARD

Courtland Cox

Courtland Cox

Larry Rubin

Larry Rubin

Kimberly Johnson

Kimberly Johnson

Bernice Johnson Reagon

Bernice Johnson Reagon

Member Emeritus
Bruce Hartford

Bruce Hartford

Charles Cobb

Charles Cobb

Sharlene Kranz

Sharlene Kranz

Geri Augusto

Geri Augusto

Joyce Ladner

Joyce Ladner

Maisha Moses

Maisha Moses

Judy Richardson

Judy Richardson

Jamil Al-Amin

Jamil Al-Amin

Ex-Officio
Karen Spellman

Karen Spellman

Cynthia Goodloe Palmer

Cynthia Goodloe Palmer

Robert Moses

Robert Moses

In Memoriam
Maria Varela

Maria Varela

Tim Jenkins

Tim Jenkins

Frank Smith

Frank Smith

Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons

Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons

Cleveland Sellers, Jr.

Cleveland Sellers, Jr.

Freddie Greene Biddle

Freddie Greene Biddle

Jennifer Lawson

Jennifer Lawson

Dorothy Miller Zellner

Dorothy Miller Zellner

Phil Hutchings

Phil Hutchings

Ex-Officio

PLANNING COMMITTEE

  • Freddie Greene Biddle
  • Charles Cobb
  • Shirley Wright Cooks
  • Courtland Cox
  • Bruce Hartford
  • Joshua M. Myers
  • Kimberly Johnson
  • Sharlene Kranz
  • Joyce Ladner
  • Jennifer Lawson
  • Judy Richardson
  • Larry Rubin
  • Zoharah Simmons
  • Karen Spellman

FAQ

What is the SNCC 60th Anniversary Virtual Conference?

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) was a civil rights organization that was founded in April 1960 at Shaw University in Raleigh, N.C. Student leaders from colleges across the south who were involved in sit-ins and other direct action to protest segregation came together for a Southwide Youth Leadership Conference. Remember, in 1960 there was no Internet, no e-mail, no IM, no phone conferencing. So getting together in person was the best way for the disparate groups to meet each other and strategize together. Delegates came to the founding conference from colleges all across the South. (For a complete list of the colleges represented go to https://snccdigital.org/events/founding-of-sncc/)

The SNCC 60th Anniversary Conference in October celebrates the anniversary of the October 1960 conference that officially made SNCC an organization. SNCC the organization was active from 1960 to around 1970. While it is no longer in existence, its legacy continues through the SNCC Legacy Project. Our vision is that SNCC veterans from the 1960s and the leaders of today’s social justice movements will meet and share and plan for the future.

Who is organizing the Conference?

The SNCC Legacy Project came into being after the SNCC 50th Anniversary Conference in April 2010. The Legacy Project are SNCC veterans and a few younger allies who work to share the legacy of SNCC with today’s social justice activists, historians, and future researchers. To register for the Conference click HERE

Where and when will the Conference be held?

This is a virtual completely online Conference. While Covid-19 restrictions prevent us from meeting in person, we can be together on Zoom for a meaningful and joyous gathering.

What will the program look like?

Our program committee is actively planning an exciting, informative and inspiring program for the three days of the Conference.  Programming will run from 1pm to 6pm (EDT) on October 14, 15, 16, 2021, and will include plenary sessions, workshops, breakout groups, a book fair, music and other cultural events.

What will the Conference cost?

Registration for adults is $100.
Registration for students is $50.

How can I be in touch with the Conference organizers?

I've already registered. How can I log in?

If you are already registered and need to login click here.

SNCC 60th Anniversary Sponsors

XQ Institute
The Arca Foundation
Boston Women's Activist Group
UNCF
Open Society Foundations
CCAP Consulting, LLC
400 Years of African American History Commission
Ben & Jerry's Foundation
The Andrew Goodman Foundation
In memoriam Betty Garman Robinson

Contact Us

    If you are already registered and need to login click here

    To Learn More About SNCC Visit

    snccdigital.org
    sncclegacyproject.org